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How to Get a Graduate Job in Marketing

Connie Evans

Marketing is an excellent career option for recent graduates for a number of reasons. Not only are marketing roles accessible for a wide range of grads due to the fact that a diverse variety of degree subjects provide the necessary skills required for a marketing position – primarily those that involve a substantial amount of essay writing such as English, History and Languages.

There is also a huge variety of different marketing roles available as any consumer-facing company will require a marketing team, the size of the team itself will depend on the size of the company.

However, marketing roles are often highly sought after and therefore, when applying you should be prepared for tough competition and a rigorous application and interview process. One of the best possible ways to increase your chances of success is to ensure that you have as much relevant experience as possible. This doesn’t always have to be in the form of official work experience or internships. It can be something as simple as managing social media accounts for your university society or writing for a blog, either your own or one that allows contributions. This experience will allow you to enhance your writing skills, specifically helping you to learn to write in a non-academic style.

Adapting your skills to write in a more personable and approachable style is important if you are to succeed in a marketing role, of course being a stickler for spelling and grammar is key but you must write in such a way that will encourage people to engage and connect with your content. In a similar vein, having experience in using social media accounts as a form of promotion, whether it be for a university society, an event you’ve helped put on or something similar, will also be incredibly beneficial to securing a marketing role.

Due to the popularity of marketing roles, it is also important that you are clear on what type of role you want to apply for before you begin your job hunt. There are two possible options:

  • Working as part of an in-house marketing team – choose to work in-house for a company, you will be concentrating on the marketing material for that company only.
  • Or, working for a marketing agency – working at an agency often involves being responsible for the marketing and communications of several different brands.

If you’re uncertain as to which option is best for you, it may be a good idea to try and gain some work experience working both in-house and at an agency before you begin applying for full-time, permanent positions.

There is often room for excelling in a marketing role however, you must prove your abilities early on in the job and continue to create innovative and exciting content for your brand. You’re likely to start out in a low-level position such as an Intern or Marketing Executive. However, within a year you may be given a promotional opportunity and find yourself moving into higher positions such as Content Writer, Digital Marketing Manager and eventually progressing into a Senior Marketing Manager role. This progression is often all down to proving yourself whilst on the job and demonstrating enthusiasm and passion for the marketing tasks you are required to carry out. If any of these job titles sound a little confusing to you, or you’d like to know the differences between them, check out our blog post on decoding job titles!

There are many elements of marketing that overlap with other job roles in the realms of PR, sales and advertising. As a result, if you’re working in-house as part of a company’s marketing team it isn’t uncommon for you to work as part of a wider communications team which may include those in other areas of communications. Therefore, working well as part of a team is often crucial for success, being positive about collaboration will help you to achieve the goals and tasks that you’re set.

For more information on marketing roles and the pros and cons of working in a marketing team, check out our page in the TalentPool Candidate Handbook.